Rwanda's Gacaca Courts - Paul Christoph Bornkamm - Oxford.

Rwanda’s national court system, and the Gacaca courts. This article investigates the attitudes of the people most affected by the Rwandan genocide towards the various justice initiatives.

Rwanda's Gacaca Courts: A Preliminary Critique. Source: (2006) Journal of African Law. 50(2):94-117. More than a decade after the genocide in Rwanda, all efforts were still failing to achieve justice for victims. This article begins by contrasting retributive and restorative justice. The nation’s gacaca courts are a move away from retribution and toward reconciliation. The gacaca courts are.

Rwanda’s gacaca courts are hailed as a post-genocide.

An Assessment of Rwanda’s Gacaca Courts TIMOTHY LONGMAN After taking power in 1994, the Rwandan Patriotic Front put a government in place. Among its many initiatives, none has gained as much attention as the innovative judicial initiative known as gacaca.In an attempt to guarantee accountability for the genocide, to promote rule of law, and to speed up the prosecution of those accused of.Rwanda's Gacaca courts provide an innovative response to the genocide of 1994. Incorporating elements of both African dispute resolution and of Western-style criminal courts, Gacaca courts are in line with recent trends to revive traditional grassroots mechanisms as a way of addressing a violent past. Having been devised as a holistic approach to prosecution and punishment as well as to.Richard Moncrieff says Inside Rwanda’s Gacaca Courts: Seeking Justice After Genocide is an excellent study for those seeking to understand both Gacaca and modern Rwanda. Rwanda’s Gacaca Courts, a neo-traditional justice mechanism set up to deal with the overwhelming caseload following the 1994 Rwanda genocide, judged hundreds of thousands of people between 2005 and 2012.


Rwanda’s Gacaca Courts: Between Retribution and Reparation is a research monograph that attempts to accomplish three interrelated objectives: 1) to contribute to the growing discussion on the applicability of international standards within national responses to human rights abuses, particularly regarding investigation, prosecution, and reparation; 2) to attest that Rwanda’s genocide courts.Rwanda's gacaca courts were established as a response to the backlog of untried genocide cases. These courts disturbingly distinguish between genocide and war crimes committed during the same era, trying only those accused of genocide. This article argues that the gacaca process will contribute to the insecurity of all Rwandan citizens in the future, since it pursues inequitable justice.

On December 11, 2014, Rwanda’s National Commission for the Fight against Genocide (CNLG) decided digitization was the best way to preserve more than 63 million Gacaca trial Archives.As of 2017, almost 35 million archives have been scanned, according to The New Times. The digitization of the millions of archives is important for preserving the history of Rwanda and the truth of its genocide.

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Rwanda’s prisons are overcrowded and the number of suspects is estimated at over 761, 448 in all categories of criminal responsibility. The approximately 12,000 Gacaca courts spread across the country are able to prosecute these cases more quickly than a national court system. The restorative justice value and the pragmatic necessity of Gacaca courts are evident in their mandate and process.

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Rwanda’s Response: The Gacaca Courts As discussions about a large-scale response to the genocide continued, the new Rwandan government—comprised mainly of members of the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) rebel army that stopped the genocide—was beginning to punish suspected per- petrators. In 1994 and 1995, government officials searched for people suspected of participating in the genocide.

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Genocide, Justice, and Rwanda’s Gacaca Courts. This article provides the first analysis of the outcomes of the gacaca courts, a traditional community-based justice system that was greatly modified to address crimes of genocide. After briefly reviewing the creation of the National Service of Gacaca Jurisdictions, it explains the court process. Then, it presents an overview of the outcomes of.

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Discordant Narratives in Rwanda’s Gacaca Courts. Authors; Authors and affiliations; Ananda Breed; Chapter. 250 Downloads; Abstract. Gacaca was the post-genocide Rwandan government’s solution to address the mass participation of citizens in the genocide against Tutsi in 1994, with the mass participation of the population in l ocal-level courts with the claim it would achieve both justice.

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The Gacaca Courts, Post-Genocide Justice and Reconciliation in Rwanda. Since 2001, the gacaca community courts have been the centrepiece of Rwanda’s justice and reconciliation programme. Nearly every adult Rwandan has participated in the trials, principally by providing eyewitness testimony concerning genocide crimes. Lawyers are banned from any official involvement, an issue that has.

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After two years of pre-trial activity, nearly all of the 1,545 gacaca courts in Rwanda formally began trials on Saturday. Only 118 such courts had previously conducted trials, a kind of “pilot” program for the gacaca system. Gacaca courts were introduced in 1999 as a way of dealing with the hundreds of thousands of Rwandans accused of involvement in the.

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The purpose of this study is to examine the efficacy of Rwanda’s approach to reconciliation as a tool for nation-building. Three key mechanisms adopted by the Rwandan state to achieve this aim were identified and analysed. These include the traditional judicial system of Gacaca courts, social reconstruction through community-based programmes and the introduction of economic policies to drive.

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Rwanda’s FDU-Inkingi Party leader, peace and social justice activist Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza (3), spoke to Ann Garrison for Womens’ International News Gathering Service (WINGS) (4) in July 2010, near the close of Rwanda’s 2010 presidential election year, which was really an election stage play complete with election observers from the U.S. and the U.K. Incumbent Rwandan President Paul.

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Part of the Courts Commons, Dispute Resolution and Arbitration Commons, International Law Commons, and the Jurisprudence Commons Citation Information Anna Spain, Integration Matters: Rethinking the Architecture of International Dispute Resolution, 32 U. PA. J. INT'L.

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